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Achievements

The History and Philosophy Departments joined together to hold an awards ceremony for students in the department. Students Jesse Coleman, Allyssa Edwards, Franco Fuenes, Henry Glick, Delaney Harper, Jesse LeBouef, and Joeseph Pitre were awarded for their excellence as students, writers, and leaders. Faculty from both departments came together with friends and family of the awardees to express their support for the students. 

 

You can find photos taken by Dr. Justin Nystrom here.

Andrea Norwood won Best Freshmen/Sophomore in the Monroe Library Student Research Competition. Their paper, A Changing Identity: Loyola’s LGBT+ Organizations Over the Years (1991-2012) was written for Dr. Allison Edgren's The Historian's Craft class. Andrea said they enjoyed writing this paper because as a Freshman, they had never worked extensively with primary sources prior to this class, and they were excited to engage with the material. For the paper, Andrea used the Special Collections on the Monroe Library's website.

Analene McCullough was the recipient of the Senior Thesis Project award from the Monroe Library Student Research Competition. Her thesis was titled The Students for A Democratic Society and the Weather Underground: Transition to Violence, which examines Students for a Democratic Society, a movement of progressive young people from the 1960s, and how it transformed into a radical and violent group targeted by the FBI. Department chair, Dr. Mark Fernandez, advised her through the process of writing her thesis.

Dr. Garrett Fontenot graduated from Loyola University New Orleans in 2012. He was always interested in studying History, and chose Loyola after touring college campuses and finding the feeling of home here on campus. After finishing his Bachelor’s degree, Dr. Fontenot went on to Notre Dame University to get both his Masters in History and Ph.D where he researched eighteenth century French North America. While conducting his research, Dr. Fontenot received a Fulbright Scholarship and did research in Montreal. 

Dr. Margaret Peacock is an Associate Professor of History and Director of Undergraduate Studies at University of Alabama. She graduated from Loyola University New Orleans in December of 1994. She originally majored in Political Science, but after taking a German history class with the now retired Dr. Cook, she decided to best know politics you need to know history and changed her major. During her time at Loyola, Dr. Peacock studied abroad in Russia just five months after the fall of the Soviet Union.

Rachel Henderson is a Loyola University New Orleans graduate. She graduated in 2008, and after giving some thought to graduate or law school, she decided it was not right for her. She says she has no regrets on skipping out on grad school as she feels that the people she has met and things she has accomplished would not have been possible had she continued in school. Rachel was led to Loyola by a high school History teacher in Fort Collins, Colorado who encouraged her to attend college at a Jesuit University to get a well rounded education.

In Creole Italian: How Sicilian Immigrants Shaped the Culture of America’s Most Interesting Food Town,  Dr. Justin Nystrom explores the influence Sicilian immigrants have had on New Orleans foodways. His culinary journey follows these immigrants from their first impressions on Louisiana food culture in teh mid-1830's and along their path until the 1970's. Each chapter touches on events that involved Sicilian immigrants and the relevancy of their lives and impact on New Orleans.

The History Department would like to congratulate our 2018 awards winners:  

 

  • Thanh T. Mai (pictured above) won Outstanding History Graduate
  • Claire A. McKenna won Outstanding Semester Research Paper

 

History Professor Ashley Howard, an expert in the global history of racial violence, was recently featured by Scholars Strategy Network's podcast No Jargon to discuss protests that turn violent in American history. 

The podcast explains protest origins, and how new laws, policing methods, and social media have changed the way people demonstrate.

Listen To The Podcast

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