Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Site Navigation Skip to Main Content

Academic Research

As a Loyola student, you have the opportunity to work alongside our talented professors to partner in collaborative research. Learn more about some recent research and projects currently underway.

Blue crab larvae into the Lake Pontchartrain estuary

Mallory Hirschler (ENVB major) was awarded a Louisiana Board of Regents S.U.R.E. grant which allows her to work under faculty mentorship of Professor Frank Jordan (Biological Sciences) to conduct a study of recruitment of blue crab larvae into the Lake Pontchartrain estuary. A goal of the Louisiana Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (LAEPSCoR) project, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), is to increase the participation of women and other underrepresented minorities and in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields.

Broomstick

English Department Chair Professor John Biguenet’s current play, Broomstick, brings to life a witch who confesses all—her first love affair, how she discovered her powers, what she has done with them. Having won a Continued Life of New Plays Fund Award from the National New Play Network, Broomstick began its Rolling World Premiere with an extended run at New Jersey Repertory Company and will go on to other productions at Montana Repertory Theatre (Missoula), Fountain Theatre (Los Angeles), Southern Rep Theatre (New Orleans), and Playwrights Theatre (Madison, NJ).

Metaphysical thought of the late thirteenth century philosopher-theologian James of Viterbo

Prof. Mark Gossiaux is working to produce a book-length study of the metaphysical thought of the late thirteenth century philosopher-theologian James of Viterbo. Since only some of James’ writings are available in a critical edition, Dr. Gossiaux must make use of fourteenth century manuscripts to recover the unedited parts of James’ works. These manuscripts, written in a highly abbreviated Latin, require careful and meticulous study if their secrets are to be revealed. Dr.

Atmospheric Chemistry

Chemistry students under the direction of Chemistry professor Joelle S. Underwood study the water uptake processes and chemical reactions of atmospherically relevant aerosol. Students also help develop analytical techniques for studying the physical and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosol.

Wetlands loss and the human impact on the landscape

When biology professor David White, Ph.D., takes his students into the swamp, he likes to go after dark. The wetlands south of New Orleans that he leads his classes through in canoes are full of snakes, spiders, and insects, and he will periodically tell students where to point their flashlights so they can reflect constellations of red alligator eyes.

Algae Growth on Submerged Human Hair

Ask The Algae: A biology student and her mentor devise a novel way to determine how long corpses have been underwater to aid law enforcement efforts.

Anyone who has watched mafia movies knows what a mobster means when he says he is going to make someone "sleep with the fishes." But this method of disposing of evidence on-screen has corollaries in real life, which can present real problems for law enforcement.

Guatemalan author and activist Luis de Lión

In Luis' Footsteps: A museum memorializing a "disappeared" Guatemalan author and activist receives translation assistance from Loyola students

Nathan Henne, Ph.D., associate professor of languages and cultures, has been studying the life and work of Guatemalan author and activist Luis de Lión for eight years. In 2012, the University of Arizona Press published for the first time in English de Lión's most important work, Time Commences in Xibalbá, which Henne translated and introduced.

Pages