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Achievements

Environment & Biology professor Frank Jordan and students Dahlia Martinez and Tori Rodrigues '22 ENVB  coauthored a paper on the discovery of non-native swamp eels in Bayou St. John, New Orleans.

 

Check it out here!

The Loyola University New Orleans Environment students have been working hard the past few years to enhance their on-campus curriculum through their capstone experiences.  To earn a degree from the Environment Program, each student must complete a project which further develops their skills as a scholar.  Some choose an internship where the practical experience usually involves service-learning with a community, government, tourism, or non-government organization.  Others choose research that involves novel ideas developed through data collection or library study.  These experiences often p

The Most Outstanding Environment Major Service Award - given to an Environment student for excellence in service to the program, for all of your work over the years during your time at Loyola. We look forward to seeing how you use your degree to make a difference in the environment sector.     

The Most Outstanding Environment Major Research Award - given to an Environment student for excellence in research for your natural history studies on the brown widow spider.  We look forward to seeing how you use your degree to make a difference in the environment sector.

The Most Outstanding Environment Major Service Award - given to an Environment student for excellence in service to the program, for all of your work over the years with Late Nights at Loyola, DSAC rep, volunteer work in the community, and all of the other great work you have done during

I recently transitioned into an Ecologist position within my company, Arcadis. I am doing wetland delineation, environmental impact surveys, and writing reports for the DOT concerning the environmental/ecological impact of infrastructure expansion in Georgia. Arcadis subsidizes higher education and I intend to pursue my Masters and potentially a PhD in the coming years. It’s an exciting opportunity and my education at Loyola has helped me find my way here. 

 

Earned, not given. 

I graduated as a US Coast Guardsman and I couldn’t be happier! Next stop: USCGC Petrel in San Diego!

Mariana Kendall, ENVB ’20, is studying the effects of the removal of invasive water hyacinth with the use of the herbicide 2,4-D on aquatic macroinvertebrate communities that live on the

Dr. Joel MacClellan (Philosophy faculty 2014-present, Ph.D. University of Tennessee, 2012). Professor MacClellan teaches courses such as Environmental Ethics and the Philosophy of Science at Loyola. His recent research is in the ethics of conservation biology, and his recent talks include an argument that wild animals’ have limited privacy rights which can be violated through documentary filmmaking, zoo cameras, wildlife tracking, etc., and the view that an animal rights perspective is compatible with invasive species management.

Allie Belcher, Environmental Studies minor, is spending the spring semester at the St. Eustatia Center for Archaeological Research in the Caribbean going out into the field and digging in areas to find artifacts that can tell us something about the history of the island. Once they properly collected artifacts, they then catalogue them by recording their context and identifying each item. From there, they can either reaffirm what is known about St. Eustatius’ history or create a new story altogether.

 

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